Rosie Kelly-Smith

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  • The Buddha of Suburbia

    A wild, wicked and wonderful read

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    The Buddha of Suburbia, published in 1990, was Kureishi's first novel with which he won the Whitbread Prize for best first novel and has since been turned into a four-part mini series for television. The novel is set in 1970's Britain at the height of the punk revolution and follows the character of Karim, a hybrid teenager growing up in the suburbs of South London, with a despondent English mother and an Indian father who fancies himself as something of a spiritual oracle. We observe Karim growing up as a brown face in a still mainly white Britain, and trying desperately to find his own identity, which causes him to come into contact with some truly bizarre people and leads him into highly entertaining situations. The novel is highly sexually charged, with characters both young and old experiencing various sexual awakenings, and at the same time brilliantly portrays the mundaneness of life in middle-class suburbia. Kureishi's wicked and witty descriptions of uncomforta...The Buddha of Suburbia, published in 1990, was Kureishi's first novel with which he won the Whitbread Prize for best first novel and has since been turned into a four-part mini series for television. The novel is set in 1970's Britain at the height of the punk revolution and follows the character of Karim, a hybrid teenager growing up in the suburbs of South London, with a despondent English mother and an Indian father who fancies himself as something of a spiritual oracle. We observe Karim growing up as a brown face in a still mainly white Britain, and trying desperately to find his own identity, which causes him to come into contact with some truly bizarre people and leads him into highly entertaining situations. The novel is highly sexually charged, with characters both young and old experiencing various sexual awakenings, and at the same time brilliantly portrays the mundaneness of life in middle-class suburbia. Kureishi's wicked and witty descriptions of uncomfortable yet all too familiar scenes at the family dinner table are sure to strike a chord of recognition with many, whilst the confrontational way with which he deals with the racial prejudice Karim, his father and family friends are subjected to will certainly leave some readers uncomfortable. I think it is the way in which Kureishi juxtaposes raw realism with outrageous characters that really makes this book brilliant. This book is without social airs and graces and is completely unashamed and unrestained. I haven't read anything so frank and entertaining in a long while. (more)

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Find me at: www.completelynovel.com/rosie-kellysmith

Interests Reading fiction, going to the gym, and travelling