Writers: Anne Bronte

  • John Marr

    The 'Other' Bronte

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    I am unsure if it is with the utmost temerity that I chose to review this book. Who am I to pass opinion on such an established classic, which has be analysed and scrutinised to the most minute level by literary critics and theorists the world over? What opinion could I possibly voice that has not been voiced before far more eloquently than I ever could? I suppose the chief aim of this review is to bring to the attention of others this glorious work by arguably the least renowned Bront

  • Ben Fowler

    An unfairly neglected classic

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    Mention the Bronte sisters to anyone and chances are they'll think of Emily's Wuthering Heights or Charlotte's Jane Eyre. Their sister Anne tends to get forgotten but, whilst she never managed to muster the emotional power that Emily managed so superbly in Wuthering Heights, The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall has intelligence and feeling to spare. For me, it's at least the equal if not better of Jane Eyre. Anne shows a better understanding of the male perspective than either Charlotte or Emily in her protagonist Gilbert Markham. Unsatisfied with his life but unsure why, Gilbert's life is turned upside down by the arrival of Helen, a mysterious widow who is unwilling to share any details of her past marriage. As the two grow closer, much to the chagrin of the easily-scandalised local community, Helen tells Gilbert of her abusive marriage to alcoholic Arthur Huntingdon. Gloriously melodramatic, Helen's independent, forthright female protagonist is in the same spirit as Jane Eyre bu...Mention the Bronte sisters to anyone and chances are they'll think of Emily's Wuthering Heights or Charlotte's Jane Eyre. Their sister Anne tends to get forgotten but, whilst she never managed to muster the emotional power that Emily managed so superbly in Wuthering Heights, The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall has intelligence and feeling to spare. For me, it's at least the equal if not better of Jane Eyre. Anne shows a better understanding of the male perspective than either Charlotte or Emily in her protagonist Gilbert Markham. Unsatisfied with his life but unsure why, Gilbert's life is turned upside down by the arrival of Helen, a mysterious widow who is unwilling to share any details of her past marriage. As the two grow closer, much to the chagrin of the easily-scandalised local community, Helen tells Gilbert of her abusive marriage to alcoholic Arthur Huntingdon. Gloriously melodramatic, Helen's independent, forthright female protagonist is in the same spirit as Jane Eyre but she, ultimately, has more to contend with. Free of the fortuitous coincidences that Jane Eyre's final third is full of, Anne Bronte's Tenant is a fascinating feminist classic. (more)

Average Book Rating

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