Writers: Aravind Adiga

  • Ailish Mcalpine-Green

    Adiga pounces at the Booker Prize with a debut novel that has bite

    Balram Halwai is the White Tiger - the smartest boy in his village, but he must work in a teashop to help his family. After a rich man hires Balram as his chauffeur though, he is taken from the poorness of his home to the wealthy city. He soon realizes that there is only one way he can become part of this glamorous new India - by murdering his master. Balram looks back at this journey through a series of letters, a first-person confession, highlighting the wealth inequality of the people of India. '"The White Tiger" is as compelling for its subject matter as for the voice of its narrator - amoral, cynical, unrepentant, yet deeply endearing.'- Waterstones `Unlike almost any other Indian novel you might have read in recent years, this page-turner offers a completely bald, angry, unadorned portrait of the county...you'll read it in a trice and find yourself gripped.' -Andrew Holgate, Sunday Times Extract from the book: "In the old days there were one thousand castes and de...Balram Halwai is the White Tiger - the smartest boy in his village, but he must work in a teashop to help his family. After a rich man hires Balram as his chauffeur though, he is taken from the poorness of his home to the wealthy city. He soon realizes that there is only one way he can become part of this glamorous new India - by murdering his master. Balram looks back at this journey through a series of letters, a first-person confession, highlighting the wealth inequality of the people of India. '"The White Tiger" is as compelling for its subject matter as for the voice of its narrator - amoral, cynical, unrepentant, yet deeply endearing.'- Waterstones `Unlike almost any other Indian novel you might have read in recent years, this page-turner offers a completely bald, angry, unadorned portrait of the county...you'll read it in a trice and find yourself gripped.' -Andrew Holgate, Sunday Times Extract from the book: "In the old days there were one thousand castes and destinies in India," says Balram. "These days there are two castes: Men with Big Bellies, and Men with Small Bellies." Aravind Adiga was born in Madras (now Chennai), India, in 1974. He has worked as a journalist for the Washington, DC bureau of the Financial Times, as a financial correspondent in New York and is Time magazine's Asia correspondent. (more)

  • Georgina Lewis

    a great taste of India for the uninformed

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    Wow - this is exactly the kind of book I love. A great story and you learn something about politics AND it challenges your assumptions. To be honest, I have never really read about or studied India, never been there, not had many friends from India and so essentially know nothing except that loads of people go there and love it, that call centres are often based there and that there is a massive population with massive eceonomic disparity. This is an example of how by telling a relatively simple story abouot a person, their family and life,a book can put complicated issues about politics, class, religion and society into a context that brings them to life. Don't get me wrong, I don't now think I'm an expert on the contry having read one account, and I'm sure there are plenty of tetxs to counter the often bleak and cynical views of this writer, but it was such an eye-openedr and so engaging. Challenges your views about right and wrong and really gives a chance to experience the ...Wow - this is exactly the kind of book I love. A great story and you learn something about politics AND it challenges your assumptions. To be honest, I have never really read about or studied India, never been there, not had many friends from India and so essentially know nothing except that loads of people go there and love it, that call centres are often based there and that there is a massive population with massive eceonomic disparity. This is an example of how by telling a relatively simple story abouot a person, their family and life,a book can put complicated issues about politics, class, religion and society into a context that brings them to life. Don't get me wrong, I don't now think I'm an expert on the contry having read one account, and I'm sure there are plenty of tetxs to counter the often bleak and cynical views of this writer, but it was such an eye-openedr and so engaging. Challenges your views about right and wrong and really gives a chance to experience the mindset of someone I would be unlikely to come across in everyday life. A lot of it is quite uncomfortable reading- human nature can be ugly and the author presents his protagonist with warts and all - but you still end up on his side somehow. A great page-turner and incredibly easy to read for something with so many ideas to express. But I would love to know the reaction of Indian/ more informed readers - please tell me if you agree/disagree!! (more)

Average Book Rating

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