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Writers: Cecelia Ahern

  • Visitor

    If you could see me now - Cecelia Ahern

    *tuts* Am I amongst snobs here? Dear dear... Those of you who like magical realism must get into this heart-warming little book by ridiculously young, successful and charming Cecelia Ahern, daughter of Bertie, the former Irish PM. And NOT be put off by the fact she is branded under chick-lit. "If you could see me now" is the story of Elizabeth Egan the meticulous perfectionist interior designer who is the legal guardian of Luke, her nephew. Elizabeth's sister Saoirse is a dangerously free spirit in the extreme and thereby unfit to parent her son. Elizabeth's perfectly 'beige' and minimalist world is overthrown with the entrance of the mysterious Ivan... Luke's imaginary friend, much to Elizabeth's trepidation and the adventures that ensue colour the book beautifully. Cecelia Ahern wrote her first novel at twenty one (so I have two years more for inspiration to strike - she was probably bored of her dissertation....) and was an immediate success. Her very latest book "The Gift" is ...*tuts* Am I amongst snobs here? Dear dear... Those of you who like magical realism must get into this heart-warming little book by ridiculously young, successful and charming Cecelia Ahern, daughter of Bertie, the former Irish PM. And NOT be put off by the fact she is branded under chick-lit. "If you could see me now" is the story of Elizabeth Egan the meticulous perfectionist interior designer who is the legal guardian of Luke, her nephew. Elizabeth's sister Saoirse is a dangerously free spirit in the extreme and thereby unfit to parent her son. Elizabeth's perfectly 'beige' and minimalist world is overthrown with the entrance of the mysterious Ivan... Luke's imaginary friend, much to Elizabeth's trepidation and the adventures that ensue colour the book beautifully. Cecelia Ahern wrote her first novel at twenty one (so I have two years more for inspiration to strike - she was probably bored of her dissertation....) and was an immediate success. Her very latest book "The Gift" is released this Christmas for under a tenner (that means �9.99) in WH Smiths but don't let me influence Amazon-lovers... The reason I think she's a wonderful writer is her ability to key into emotions succintly and resonantly, she's not your regular-plotted "quirky thirty something meets dashing man of her dreams in between a lurid cover" type. She is the Paris of this type of writing. Romance and incidental magic is what she is about. The film of the book is in production and stars Hugh Jackman. (more)

  • Visitor

    So that's where all my loose change has gone!!!

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    More enjoyable than I expected, but definitely lighter fare.. The novel concerns Sandy Shortt, a private investigator who spends her life finding both things and people (an obsession which stems from the disappearance of one of Sandy's acquaintances during childhood). While trying to find the missing brother of one of her clients, Sandy herself goes missing and ends up in 'Here', a place which seems to be the catch-all location of both missing objects and people from the world over. The novel then hinges on whether or not Sandy can make her way back... I liked the ideas behind this book, which seem to be optimistic and even hope-filled...the idea that no one and nothing is ever really lost, and that, though missing from the 'real world', these items and people can find a new place elsewhere... I felt the characters themselves were a bit superficial, which I didn't like as much. To be more precise, I didn't expect a full-scale, introspective character analysis, but the m...More enjoyable than I expected, but definitely lighter fare.. The novel concerns Sandy Shortt, a private investigator who spends her life finding both things and people (an obsession which stems from the disappearance of one of Sandy's acquaintances during childhood). While trying to find the missing brother of one of her clients, Sandy herself goes missing and ends up in 'Here', a place which seems to be the catch-all location of both missing objects and people from the world over. The novel then hinges on whether or not Sandy can make her way back... I liked the ideas behind this book, which seem to be optimistic and even hope-filled...the idea that no one and nothing is ever really lost, and that, though missing from the 'real world', these items and people can find a new place elsewhere... I felt the characters themselves were a bit superficial, which I didn't like as much. To be more precise, I didn't expect a full-scale, introspective character analysis, but the motivations of particular characters, including Sandy herself, were somewhat frustrating to me. But this was a fun and light book nevertheless and I would be interested to read what other offerings Ahern might provide... (more)

  • Visitor

    Oh dear...

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    Twee, sentimental, boring drivel. On the up side, the cover design is absolutely gorgeous and it's almost worth having it on your shelf just to look at. Look at, mind, not read.

  • Visitor

    The Gift

    Oh dear indeed Helena, I have to agree. Despite appearing to read nothing BUT "sentimental boring drivel" myself (which is personally untrue unless you wish to defame Austen in context) I also did not warm to this book. It was florid, saccharine and unsatisfactory. However I will venture that the possible reason for this marked change in Ahern's prose style is due to the influence of her being co-producer of the ABC comedy series "Samantha Who?" which is about a blonde (who looks suspiciously like the author) who has had a spate of that dependable pyscho-literary disease amnesia. After this Samantha must reconstruct her life's memories. Not only is "The Gift" a sell-out because of its overly cinematic qualities, but also because it sounds like a twee and moralising episode of "Desperate Housewives". The book concerns the life of Lou Suffern,(I read this as Lucifer, mal chance) - a charming but flawed top businessman, chiselled of jawline and egotistical of heart. He cheats on hi...Oh dear indeed Helena, I have to agree. Despite appearing to read nothing BUT "sentimental boring drivel" myself (which is personally untrue unless you wish to defame Austen in context) I also did not warm to this book. It was florid, saccharine and unsatisfactory. However I will venture that the possible reason for this marked change in Ahern's prose style is due to the influence of her being co-producer of the ABC comedy series "Samantha Who?" which is about a blonde (who looks suspiciously like the author) who has had a spate of that dependable pyscho-literary disease amnesia. After this Samantha must reconstruct her life's memories. Not only is "The Gift" a sell-out because of its overly cinematic qualities, but also because it sounds like a twee and moralising episode of "Desperate Housewives". The book concerns the life of Lou Suffern,(I read this as Lucifer, mal chance) - a charming but flawed top businessman, chiselled of jawline and egotistical of heart. He cheats on his wife, never cuddles his baby, and never shows at his daughter's school play. His career is his life. Meanwhile his life crumbles. One day Lou spots Gabe a homeless man outside his office and gives him a job in the mailroom. Gabe is diligent and makes Lou feel professionally insecure - not to mention he posesses the trait that Lou desires most in himself, the desire to be in two places at once. Enter the Ahernian element of magic. The merits of this book include - the ability of Ahern to penetrate the business world, the novelty of her similes showcasing a wit that is promisng when not sugar coated and also turning the gender issue on its head. Chick lit is full of castigating tales of women who are corporate darlings but love pariahs. Ahern's talent in this book is to show that the same struggles in the work/life balance occur for men. "Men do not know when they have it good, even when they do" Ahern seems to say. Around Christmas which is when the book is set and was launched, this is a worthy "count your blessings" tale. Its sweetness however was crushed by the literary equivalent of toothache for me. Come back from America Cecelia! It does nothing for you darling. (more)

Average Book Rating

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